Avoid submitting to for-profit journals seems a lost battle. What about avoid reviewing?

Academic publishing is a strange beast. The majority of scientists think it is, as a minimum, largely inefficient, and, after a few beers, most of them would consider it not far from an elaborate scam. On the other side, nobody – almost nobody – can afford not submitting to for-profit publishers. While, as the readers of this blog know, I am actively involved in the activities to establish a new journal, open-access and self-published, with the Cultural Evolution Society, I am of course in the same situation. If I’d feel any of the drafts I am working at the moment is good enough, I will run to submit it to Nature Human Behaviour or similar…

Is there any other way out of this?

Continue reading “Avoid submitting to for-profit journals seems a lost battle. What about avoid reviewing?”

Redundant information, cultural evolution, and the perils of academic publishing

A paper I wrote together with Claudio Tennie has just been published in the Journal of Comparative Psychology. The role of redundant information in cultural transmission and cultural stabilization presents an individual-based model of the following, quite straightforward, idea (which was, admittedly, Claudio’s idea).

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